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Rockhopper penguins return to the colonies to breed in October. They usually raise two chicks, which fledge in preparation for leaving the colony by the end of February. After the egg hatches, the parents alternate at the nest. During the day, one of the…
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"Rockhopper penguins return to the colonies to breed in October. They usually raise two chicks, which fledge in preparation for leaving the colony by the end of February. After the egg hatches, the parents alternate at the nest. During the day, one of the parents is at sea fishing. That parent returns to the nest by late afternoon to feed the chicks and relieve their partner. This is a very busy time on the beach, with groups of penguins coming and going. Due to their rapid population decline, the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species lists this species as “Vulnerable.” Scientists believe climate change is a major factor in their decline." - @DaisyGilardini⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ #ANTARCTICA2020 - Please join us and @onlyone to protect the ocean for generations to come: only.one/antarctica (Link in bio). ⁣⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ Photo by @DaisyGilardini ⁣⁠

⁣Expeditions don’t always go according to plan, even with the best captain. In order to inspect the hull, our captain purposely beached his vessel in the subantarctic islands, secured it upright by tying the mast on either side to the land, and then waited…
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⁣"Expeditions don’t always go according to plan, even with the best captain. In order to inspect the hull, our captain purposely beached his vessel in the subantarctic islands, secured it upright by tying the mast on either side to the land, and then waited for the tide to go down. Everything seemed under control when suddenly there was a 'snap!' and the entire sailboat lurched to the side, sending our whole team scrambling. For the next twelve hours, we couldn’t cook and we couldn’t sleep in our beds. All we could do was wait for the tide to return. Most of what we do is not glamorous, but luckily we have an amazing crew who always make the most of even the toughest situations. Looking back on this moment now, I have to laugh; this is the reality of being a NatGeo photographer. I want to give a huge thank you to everyone who has signed our petition to establish three major MPAs in Antarctica. Let's keep spreading the word and raising our voices for the future of our planet! Sign and share the petition at www.only.one/antarctica (Link in bio) and stand with us." @OnlyOne #CCAMLR2020 #ANTARCTICA2020⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ Photo and words by @Mitty⁣⁠

At Cape Washington, on the western side of the Ross Sea, lines of adult Emperors slid on their bellies to and from their colony, 10 kilometres across the sea ice towards the black cliffs. Groups of juvenile birds, still dressed in their downy suits, also…
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"At Cape Washington, on the western side of the Ross Sea, lines of adult Emperors slid on their bellies to and from their colony, 10 kilometres across the sea ice towards the black cliffs. Groups of juvenile birds, still dressed in their downy suits, also traversed the ice to the water’s edge. Though they still had more than a month before they could safely make their first plunge, the young birds were already looking out to sea. ⁣⁠⠀ ⁣⁠⠀ Early the next morning, helicopters flew us inland towards the colony, depositing us at the base of a monolith of vertical black rock, with only a short walk to the birds. Emperors were spread out over the entire Cape. Juvenile birds were testing their limits, climbing to the top of broken bits of bergs, also locked in by the ice, to look out over the scene. One large group had concentrated in the lee of a berg, and we approached slowly. Parents and chicks know each other’s unique voices and reunite by calling back and forth when the adults return with food. As we skirted around the base of the berg, the concert of several thousand voices reflected off the wall of ice behind us, so we sat and listened in stereo.⁣⁠⠀ ⁣⁠⠀ Moments before we had to leave, a single downy chick approached us curiously, stopping only a few meters away. It puffed out its chest, pointed its wings to the ground, and threw its head back, beak pointing straight for the sky. The image of that Emperor chick will never leave me, its head thrown back as if to announce its existence, demanding that we pay attention, recognize our own path of destruction, and tread lightly in this last pristine place." - @JohnBWeller⁣⁠⠀ ⁣⁠⠀ #ANTARCTICA2020⁣⁠ - Join thousands of supporters around the world in urging global leaders to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: www.only.one/antarctica (link in bio).⁣⁠⠀ ⁣⁠⠀

Sound on. 🔈 A mother humpback pivots to get a better look at @PaulNicklen in the warm waters off the Tongan coast. She is neither ghost nor phantom, but theres still something haunting about her – a titan of the sea. Every year, humpback whales in the Southern…
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Sound on. 🔈 A mother humpback pivots to get a better look at @PaulNicklen in the warm waters off the Tongan coast. She is neither ghost nor phantom, but there's still something haunting about her – a titan of the sea. Every year, humpback whales in the Southern Ocean migrate from their feeding grounds in Antarctica to mate and calve in Tonga's tropical waters. From July through November, mother whales bask in the ocean off the coast of Tonga while their babies grow and build up their strength for the long journey back to the feedings grounds in the south. #OceanSchool SeaLegacy and @OnlyOne are working to ensure these charismatic mammals have a permanent safe haven in Antarctica, where climate change and over-fishing threaten populations of krill, the tiny crustaceans these whales depend on. Help us secure three new marine protected areas for #Antarctica2020 at the link in our bio. Video by @PaulNicklen

“We stumbled across this superb iceberg, carved by water and wind, while approaching the entrance of the caldera at Deception Island. Whenever I find a particularly attractive iceberg, I make sure to do a full circumnavigation. As with humans, they always…
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“We stumbled across this superb iceberg, carved by water and wind, while approaching the entrance of the caldera at Deception Island. Whenever I find a particularly attractive iceberg, I make sure to do a full circumnavigation. As with humans, they always have their better side. We were very happy to find four chinstrap penguins climbing one of the sheer, slippery sides. I’m always amazed by the power of those little legs." - @DaisyGilardini #ANTARCTICA2020 - Please join us and @onlyone to protect the ocean for generations to come: sign the petition urging global leaders — including President @EmmanuelMacron Chancellor Merkel @bundeskanzlerin President @UrsulavonderLeyen President Putin, and President Xi — to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: only.one/antarctica (link in bio)⁣. Photo by @DaisyGilardini

To get where you need to be, sometimes youve just got to dive headfirst into the unknown... SeaLegacy started as a dream in a basement, shared by co-founders @Mitty and @PaulNicklen. The rest of the story has played out at your fingertips, before your eyes,…
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To get where you need to be, sometimes you've just got to dive headfirst into the unknown... SeaLegacy started as a dream in a basement, shared by co-founders @Mitty and @PaulNicklen The rest of the story has played out at your fingertips, before your eyes, across social media and beyond. But, in the beginning, no one knew exactly what SeaLegacy would become; what we could achieve. Today, we have over 125,000 signatures urging world leaders to create three new marine protected areas (MPAs) in Antarctica. That is INCREDIBLE. From our entire SeaLegacy team, thank you to every person whose put their name on the list for #Antarctica2020. Tag your friends in the comments below to sign (link in bio). 🐧

“There is something magical about glacier ice. These massive, intricate structures toy with the light in a way I find intoxicating, and every specimen is more photogenic than the last – the perfect subject matter for my fine art. Although beautiful, they…
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“There is something magical about glacier ice. These massive, intricate structures toy with the light in a way I find intoxicating, and every specimen is more photogenic than the last – the perfect subject matter for my fine art. Although beautiful, they also tell a tragic narrative. These sculptures dwindle in size every day as they slowly melt out of existence, and it astounds me to know that this glacial palace, so impressive when I first encountered it, is now long gone, never to return. The opportunity to capture their ephemeral nature, for which this piece is named, is a rare privilege, and I am grateful for it." - @PaulNicklen Join us, co-founder @PaulNicklen and thousands of supporters around the world in urging global leaders to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: only.one/antarctica (link in bio) #ANTARCTICA2020⁣⁠⠀ ⁣⁠ Photo by @PaulNicklen

#ANTARCTICA2020⁣⁠ - Join thousands of supporters around the world in urging global leaders to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: www.only.one/antarctica (link in bio). The fluke of a humpback whale lifts above the sea in the warm glow…
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#ANTARCTICA2020⁣⁠ - Join thousands of supporters around the world in urging global leaders to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: www.only.one/antarctica (link in bio). "The fluke of a humpback whale lifts above the sea in the warm glow of dusk off the coast of the Antarctic peninsula. I have followed these giants across the planet with my camera from the frigid arctic to the tropical waters of the Dominican Republic as they travel tens of thousands of miles each year between their feeding and breeding grounds. Each sighting is as exhilarating as the last and, as this titan slipped back beneath the surface in a spectacular dive, I stood spellbound in the fading light pondering the amazing return from the brink of extinction these beautiful animals have made." Photo and words by @Mitty 🐋

⁣#ANTARCTICA2020 - Please join us and @onlyone to protect the ocean for generations to come: sign the petition urging global leaders — including President @EmmanuelMacron, Chancellor Merkel @bundeskanzlerin, President @UrsulavonderLeyen, President Putin,…
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#ANTARCTICA2020 - Please join us and @onlyone to protect the ocean for generations to come: sign the petition urging global leaders — including President @EmmanuelMacron Chancellor Merkel @bundeskanzlerin President @UrsulavonderLeyen President Putin, and President Xi — to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: only.one/antarctica (link in bio)⁣. ⁣⁠⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ "The icy gates of Antarctica welcoming our SeaLegacy team on expedition in 2017. A humbling and eye-opening trip that none of us will soon forget." Photo and words by @Andy_Mann

#ANTARCTICA2020 - Join us and thousands of supporters around the world in urging global leaders to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: www.only.one/antarctica (link in bio) ⁠ ⁣⁠ This is one of my favourite images because it was such a…
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#ANTARCTICA2020 - Join us and thousands of supporters around the world in urging global leaders to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: www.only.one/antarctica (link in bio) ⁠ ⁣⁠ "This is one of my favourite images because it was such a surprise. I was snorkelling around a patch of broken ice looking for penguins that might be swimming from one piece of ice to another. I turned into a dead-end and was surprised to find a couple of crabeater seals sleeping on a thin sheet of ice. I didn’t want to end up crammed into a small space with these two large seals so I tried to backtrack, but if you have ever tried to swim backwards while wearing fins you know it can be a splashy affair. Despite my attempts to be quiet, I woke them up; all I could do was point my camera up at the startled seal. The seals plunged into the water and disappeared, leaving me equally startled. I hate disturbing animals while they are resting and I truly am sorry I woke this poor guy up. Being able to share my experiences from this remote part of the world is a privilege and an honour." ⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ Photo and words by @Mitty⁣

En el gran esquema del tiempo, los seres humanos han vagado por la Tierra solo por un parpadeo. Sin embargo, nuestra presencia ha transformado el mundo para siempre. Hemos construido torres que tocan el cielo, ciudades, autopistas, minas, barcos para la guerra,…
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En el gran esquema del tiempo, los seres humanos han vagado por la Tierra solo por un parpadeo. Sin embargo, nuestra presencia ha transformado el mundo para siempre. Hemos construido torres que tocan el cielo, ciudades, autopistas, minas, barcos para la guerra, el comercio y el placer. Volamos sin alas y caminamos en la luna. El ingenio humano se encuentra en el corazón de algunas de nuestras contribuciones más grandes y destructivas a este planeta. ¿Qué pasa si aprovechamos ese poder para bien? Para proteger a nuestra Tierra y nuestros océanos. Imagina lo que podríamos hacer. Únete a nosotros en SeaLegacy, nuestros fundadores y narradores de historias y nuestros amigos @OnlyOne para que su voz se escuche. Insta a los líderes mundiales a realizar el mayor acto de protección de los océanos en la historia: www.only.one/antarctica (enlace en bio) #ANTARCTICA2020 In the grand scheme of time, human beings have wandered the Earth for only a blink - yet our presence has transformed the world forever. We've built towers that scrape the sky; cities; freeways; mines; ships for war and trade and pleasure. We fly without wings and walk on the moon. Human ingenuity sits at the heart of some of our greatest and most destructive contributions to this planet. What if we harnessed that power for good? To protect our Earth and our oceans. Imagine what we could do. Stand with us at SeaLegacy, our founders and storytellers and our friends @OnlyOne to make your voice heard. Urge global leaders to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: www.only.one/antarctica (link in bio) #ANTARCTICA2020

Changes in sea ice affect all inhabitants of Antarctica, and each species’ interaction with the ice is unique and complex. For example, Emperor Penguin colonies require very specific locations. A colony must be on fast-ice, close enough to a coastal polynya,…
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"Changes in sea ice affect all inhabitants of Antarctica, and each species’ interaction with the ice is unique and complex. For example, Emperor Penguin colonies require very specific locations. A colony must be on fast-ice, close enough to a coastal polynya, the only open water around Antarctica during the winter, so that the birds can feed – the females after they lay eggs in May, and the males after incubation in July. This requirement alone severely limits the options for a colony site, but it must also have stable ice at least through the end of December. If the fast ice breaks out too soon, the chicks won’t have time to fledge, and whole generations can be lost. If the ice doesn’t break out enough, the long treks to and from open water can prevent adult birds from bringing enough food to young birds. I visited such an Emperor colony in East Antarctica on Christmas Day in 2007. At that late date, chicks should have been ready to go to sea. But the fast ice edge was still 50km from the colony. Adult birds continued to dutifully bring back stomachs full of food, but it had obviously not been enough. The chicks were tiny, completely unprepared for their journeys. They were all marked for death. Weddell seals also require fast ice for successful breeding, but their requirements differ. The best situation for a Weddell is extensive fast ice with a perennial sea ice crack to allow access to the water below. The seals rest easy far removed from the water’s edge because leopard seals and killer whales are kept far from the colony, unable to negotiate long journeys under unbroken ice. While fast-ice is specifically important to Weddells and Emperors, almost all species are highly dependent on the broken pack-ice. For instance, Adélies and juvenile Emperors depend on the remnants of the seasonal ice during the winter. Hunting largely by sight, the wintering penguins must ride floating rafts of ice far enough north to find light – even if only for a few hours a day. If climate change forces the winter pack to recede south into the perpetual darkness, which is beginning to happen, the penguins that ride the ice will disappear." - @JohnBWeller #ANTARCTICA2020

“I love sleeping out in the open in nature, where theres nothing between me and the earth or the sky but the clothes on my back. The first rule of wildlife photography is that youre there only to observe, not to interact. Sometimes, wildlife has other ideas.…
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“I love sleeping out in the open in nature, where there's nothing between me and the earth or the sky but the clothes on my back. The first rule of wildlife photography is that you're there only to observe, not to interact. Sometimes, wildlife has other ideas. When I laid down to rest on a beach on the Antarctic peninsula back in 2018, this curious juvenile elephant seal decided to inspect me." - @PaulNicklen ICYMI: SeaLegacy co-founder @PaulNicklen just had a birthday! 🥳💙🎂 As a leader, Paul inspires us all at SeaLegacy to show up for the ocean every day. To celebrate another year around the sun together on the crazy, beautiful ride called Earth, help us secure three new marine protected areas for one of the places Paul loves most in the world - #Antarctica2020. Check out the link in our bio and sign the petition. 🇦🇶 #HappyBirthdayPaul! The world needs more of you! Photo by @DrPatrickAvery

Photography allows us to transform a millisecond into eternity, a gift I think we all take for granted in the digital age where cellphone cameras are commonplace. When in nature, I try to use this power with purpose and capture moments that convey meaning,…
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"Photography allows us to transform a millisecond into eternity, a gift I think we all take for granted in the digital age where cellphone cameras are commonplace. When in nature, I try to use this power with purpose and capture moments that convey meaning, intention, and narrative." - @PaulNicklen⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ GREAT NEWS for all the aspiring conservation and adventure photographers out there:⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ The @Ocean_Photography_Awards have been extended to August 31st, so there's still time to enter!! Judging doesn't take place until after the contest closes, but our entire team at SeaLegacy has been inspired by the passion and the love all of you have shown for the ocean through your entries so far. ⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ Tag your favourite storytellers in the comments below so they don't miss this opportunity (link in our stories), and so we can all see their work! 👇⁣⁠ ⁣⁠ Photo by @PaulNicklen

“Penguins don’t fly - in the air, that is - and they’re not known for their grace or their agility on land. Underwater it is a different story. Penguin wings evolved for swimming and for more efficient diving. They are like little tuxedo rockets in the sea;…
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“Penguins don’t fly - in the air, that is - and they’re not known for their grace or their agility on land. Underwater it is a different story. Penguin wings evolved for swimming and for more efficient diving. They are like little tuxedo rockets in the sea; launching themselves out of the water and back onto land. The little Adélie penguins, like the one in this photo, reach speeds of up to 8 km/ per hour and are capable of leaping 3m out of the water to return to land. #OceanSchool, did you know that gentoo penguins are the fastest? They can swim up to 36km/hr!" - @Mitty #ANTARCTICA2020 - Please join us and @onlyone to protect the ocean for generations to come: sign the petition urging global leaders — including President @EmmanuelMacron Chancellor Merkel @bundeskanzlerin President @UrsulavonderLeyen President Putin, and President Xi — to deliver the largest act of ocean protection in history: only.one/antarctica (link in bio)⁣. Photo by @Mitty

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